Funding

//Funding
Funding 2018-05-09T20:03:26+00:00

Cohen Veterans Bioscience
MAPPING THE GENETIC ARCHITECTURE OF PTSD BY THE PGC THROUGH A GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION (GWAS)

PI Caroline Nievergelt PhD, PI Karestan Koenen PhD, PI Israel Liberzon MD, and PI Kerry Ressler MD

Genetic factors are critical in influencing who develops PTSD Funding ($3M) from Cohen Veterans Bioscience, supported DNA extractions, genotyping, program management, and data-analysis. In partnership with Cohen Veterans Bioscience, the Stanley Center at the Broad Institute provided extensive genetics expertise and genotyping. Together, this accelerated the discovery of the first large-scale genome-wide hits for PTSD risk. This collaborative funding agreement provided support to:

  • Quadruple the size of the PGC PTSD Workgroup from 20K cases and controls to 80K subjects in 18 months.
  • Establish a Joint Steering Committee for the PGC-PTSD Workgroup to both track the achievements of the CVB-Stanley Center funding as well as create a framework for additional support of the PGC-PTSD Workgroup activities.
  • Organize and sponsor for face-to- face meetings for the PGC-PTSD Workgroup members to foster team science and future collaboration.

These efforts have been successful in bringing an additional 40+ collaborators to the PGC PTSD Workgroup and have led to the largest genome-wide association study of PTSD to date, shedding light on the genetic architecture of this complex disorder. To find out more about Cohen Veterans Bioscience, please visit: http://www.cohenveteransbioscience.org/2017/05/18/announcing-initial-findings-from-largest-study-genetic-markers-ptsd/

PSYCHIATRIC GENOMICS CONSORTIUM FOR PTSD (1R01MH106595)

PI Caroline Nievergelt PhD, PI Karestan Koenen PhD, PI Kerry Ressler MD, and PI Israel Liberzon MD

Up to 70% of the variance determining who develops Posttraumatic Stress Disorder following a severe trauma may be genetic; however, most successful analyses to date suggest that risk arises from multiple common genetic variants of small effect size, and that very large sample sizes will be needed for detection. This proposal aims to uncover the genomic architecture of PTSD through large-scale, collaborative genome- wide association studies. Identifying the pathways underlying PTSD will lead to an improved neurobiological understanding, enhanced prevention, and improved treatment of this debilitating and prevalent syndrome.

THE IMPACT OF TRAUMATIC STRESS ON THE METHYLOME: IMPLICATIONS FOR PTSD (1R01MH108826)

PI Alicia Smith PhD, PI Mark Logue PhD, PI Caroline Nievergelt  PhD, and PI Monica Uddin PhD

Recent studies report DNA methylation differences that distinguish PTSD cases from controls. The purpose of this application is to facilitate a multi-site epigenome-wide analysis of PTSD, with the long-term goal of developing an epigenetic panel that informs the prediction or treatment of PTSD.

Trauma and Genomics Modulate Brain Structure across Common Psychiatric Disorders (1R01MH111671)

PI Rajendra Morey MD, PI Mark Logue PhD, PI Kerry Ressler MD PhD, and PI Paul Thompson PhD

Exposure to trauma and abuse during childhood, a critical neurodevelopmental period, is a major risk factor for developing psychiatric conditions in adulthood. Our goal is to search for genes in adults who were exposed to psychological trauma (abuse, neglect) as children and develop psychiatric illness in adulthood in order to identify genetic variants that produce alterations in brain structure evident with MRI. Our long-term goal is to identify genetic modulators of brain structure that might inform early prediction and treatment for a range of psychiatric disorders where childhood trauma is a major risk factor.